Interpreter turned Chicken Farmer in Barotseland – SEEDS

31 October 2015
Author :   Joanne Hutchinson

By Joanne Hutchinson, Oct 16, 2015

When traveling to a new country, even if their official language is your own mother tongue, it is still a blessing to have an interpreter in a country where there are 10 indigenous languages (or language groups) spoken as a mother tongue by more than 1% of the population, four of which are each spoken by large segments of the population:

Teaching computer skills
Teaching computer skills
Mualuka crossing the river
Mualuka crossing the river
Explaining medical supplies
Explaining medical supplies

BEMBA, LOZI, NYANJA, TONGA.

Mualuka, is how I know him and he has been a most valuable asset to World Vision, Njamba and his family, his community at large and especially to SEEDS. As I have found in Zambia, especially in rural areas, most people speak more than one language and often as many as five languages.

Mualuka was the volunteer with World Vision who found Njamba and determined he was in need of a sponsor. He was also the person who took the annual photos of Njamba and filled out his progress report that was sent to me each year. Due to that experience volunteering with World Vision, Mualuka was asked to be a councilor for the government for the rural area he lives in. Again as a volunteer councilor, Mualuka has helped his community immensely. SEEDS has provided non-GMO vegetable seeds to 5 cities in Zambia for the last 3 years and I am happy to announce that the seeds are reaching one of the most remote areas of Zambia just south west of Kalabo, Barotseland.

Mualuka & I at the village
Mualuka & I at the village
Mualuka & Ngebe, Njamba’s twin sister
Mualuka & Ngebe, Njamba’s twin sister
Rural area Kalabo
Rural area Kalabo


Mualuka has successfully grown all of the different varieties of vegetable seeds that we have provided to him which  do not normally grow there. As a few examples, Honey Dew melons, cantaloupe, and Kabocha squash. With help from SEEDS, Mualuka has planted Moringa trees and built raised beds to combat drought or flooding that may occur in his area.

A most amazing venture is his chicken farm. SEEDS provided  a bag of yellow cattle corn approximately 3 lbs. (1.36kg) in weight. Zambian’s are not used to eating yellow corn as they use white corn (maize) to make their mellie-meal which is a staple in their diet. Mellie -meal is crushed white corn and used to make Nshima.
Mualuka took this bag of corn, planted it and when it grew he dried it and ground it up. He purchased 17 chickens, now has 79 chickens and plans to raise 500 and then sell them.

So from a 3 lb bag of corn, he has developed a chicken farm! See how a small thing can become really big!

Even though you will probably never see this blog, as you live in an area without internet and don’t have a computer, Thanks Mualuka for all you do! Hopefully when the road is finished to Kalabo we will do a “Voluntourism Trip” and come to see you.
Last but not least, Happy World Food Day everyone! World Food Day was set up to mark the creation of the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), which has done great things in granting people regular access to good, fresh, healthy food. Please help SEEDS feed those in need as well, including Elephants and Chickens!
Stay Well!

Tribes & Languages
Tribes & Languages
Districts
Districts
Ceremonies
Ceremonies

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Joanne Hutchinson,  the founder of Socio-Economic And Environmental Development Solutions (SEEDS) has been growing (SEEDS) since May 2011 and officially obtained charitable status on Oct. 29, 2013.Joanne has had a lifelong love of animals and concern for the environment. Always one to fight for the ‘underdog,’ Joanne has never been one to sit back at wait for others to do the right thing.Raised in Toronto Canada, Joanne spent her weekends growing up in the barn (at least the adults always knew where she was) of her Grandparent’s farm in Stroud Ontario.

Always dreaming of going to Africa, it was made possible in August of 2011 by World Vision.

Visit SEEDS online: http://sendseedstoafrica.org/

explaining the types of trees
explaining the types of trees
Mualuka, Njamba & I in 2015
Mualuka, Njamba & I in 2015
trying on Njamba’s graduation jacket
trying on Njamba’s graduation jacket

Comment

  • Godwin Kaluwe Godwin Kaluwe Saturday, 31 October 2015

    It is progressive to see such commitment in a small way. Please keep it up.

    Report

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